… by Dior. Christian Dior.

“He wanted to give women back their taste for light-heartedness; the art of seduction, he had known since his childhood that they always kept it hidden somewhere within them, even in the most dramatic circumstances.” In curtesy of www.dior.com

25th April 1950: Fashion couturier Christian Dior (1905 - 1957), designer of the 'New Look' and the 'A-line', with six of his models after a fashion parade at the Savoy Hotel, London. (Photo by Fred Ramage/Keystone/Getty Images)

25th April 1950: Fashion couturier Christian Dior (1905 – 1957), designer of the ‘New Look’ and the ‘A-line’, with six of his models after a fashion parade at the Savoy Hotel, London. (Photo by Fred Ramage/Keystone/Getty Images)

And dramatic circumstances was indeed what the war had brought upon the world for many tiresome years. Finally it was over.

Finally people step out into the light, and creativeness could flourish again. In Paris it was decided that something had to be done to make the wheels turn again, and especially to reestablish the city as the fashion capital of the world. Dior was given the role. No more rules about how much fabric you could use, and no more functionality over look. Now it was time for colours again. Now it was time for feminine expressions and sensuality.

The year was 1947 and an American journalist expressed her excitement for Diors new collection: “your dresses have such a new look”, and so the expression that marks an entire era of fashion history was born.

 

 

The Look

The New Look is best described with an overuse of everything feminine. After World War 2 there was a thirst for fashion to be clean, graceful, elegant and neat. The skirts was lively, the shoulders were soft and the waist was highlighted. The padded bra was invented, because now it was perfectly okay to emphasize the feminine shapes of a bosom. A shorter corset was also invented, to still emphasize the waistline but also make the woman more comfortable. The skirts was made longer. For one, because now there was enough fabric to make the length you wanted, but also to accentuate the feminine ankles of a woman. This particular length was very characteristic for Dior. The New Look length: just under the knee and approximately 12 inches above the ankles. Higher heels helped the ankles to become even more visible and sensual.

The colours were very feminine and especially red and blue (the American and British colours) was popular. The significant signature Dior-red lipstick also became a part of the New Look era. Extraordinary and new fabrics such as chiffon, tulle and silk organza came in style. The war had made it impossible to fabric and trade for such materials, but now the luxury overflow was saw no bounds. While clothes during the war was ment to be functional, practical and dimmed. The New Look was the absolute opposite. No more military looking pockets, and no more uniform-fashion. Instead women began to carry handbags.

For more inspirational pictures of both classic New Look dresses and modern New Look dresses click here…